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Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review

January 19, 2014 2 Comments

Introduction

The Primal Wound by Nancy Newton Verrier is a cornerstone book of modern adoption understanding. It has come highly recommended to us from about a dozen different parties, and as such two copies now reside in our bookcase.

The book is written by a psychotherapist and adoptive mother and centres on what she describes as the Primal Wound – ‘the wound that results when a child is separated from his or her mother.’

The Primal Wound Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review is available on Amazon Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review for £12.89 Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review.

 Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review

Review

I will be honest straight off the bat, I did find this book hard going at times. The language and subject matter is not exactly light reading so be prepared for some head scratching and rubbing of the eyes.

The author starts by talking about adoption in general, and some of the issues relating to adoption. She goes on to discuss the importance and indeed the strength of the bond between mother and baby.

This is potentially enough to put some prospective adopters off, but it is important to understand this bond, if adopters are to fully appreciate the feelings of their children.

The heavy stuff

As the book continues, Verrier starts looking at the breaking of that bond and what affect it has on the child. This is about the point where I had to put the book down the first time. Not because I wanted to shy away from what she was saying, but because it just got a bit too heavy for me – you will see what I mean when you read it.

In part two the book looks at how this primal wound manifests itself in people, and she uses her experience as a therapist to identify one such manifestation:

“Perhaps the most easily observed manifestation is difficulties in relationships. This is certainly one of the most prevalent for adoptees in counselling.”

This section makes for very interesting reading, as it demonstrates tangible examples of what she is discussing. It allows the reader to relate the subject matter to their own situation.

Healing

The third section is arguably the most valuable for adopters, as she applies her knowledge and experience to look at solutions, or should I say, methods of helping adoptive children cope with the wound, and the loss, and everything that goes with it.

Rating

4/5

4 stars Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review
 

The book is no easy read, and may take two or three goes to get through it. It is however, undeniably one of the most useful and pertinent books to new and experienced adoptive parents alike. Understanding the primal wound, that is the core of the book, is vital for adoptive parents, and few books do such a job in helping adopters get to grips with this understanding.

The Primal Wound Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review is available on Amazon Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review for £12.89 Adoption in the UK: The Primal Wound book review.

Please also check out by store for other great adoption books.


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About the Author:

Andrew is an adoptive father, and stay at home dad. Having adopted his son in January 2013, he is a new adoptive parent, but well versed in the adoption process. He is a married, coffee drinker, Xbox addict, and a Marketing graduate. Andrew McDougall is an alias he uses to protect the identity of his adopted son.

Comments (2)

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  1. Isabel says:

    hi Andrew, I have exactly the same feelings for this book.

    In fact I put it down a month ago and am slightly dreading getting back in to it. It does not help that she states in the intro ‘don’t even think about going into adoption for altruistic reasons.’…

    The section on loss also made me doubt if I really wanted to get into adoption, such is the possibility of failure. It’s scary to read and realise that she makes so much sense.

    It’s good news then that the last bit offers solutions. I still would like to find a book that has no theory and nothing but solutions! Maybe there should be a database of tried and tested methods/tricks/solutions/ideas for dealing with situations in adoption!

    (Speaking from the theory side as we are waiting to go to adoption panel next week!)

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